Insights: Brexit

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Last orders on EU wide enforcement of UK judgments?

Alexander Wildschütz |

In only a few hours 47 years of the United Kingdom’s membership in the European Union and in its predecessor, the European Economic Community, will come to an end. Over the next 11 months it will, hopefully, become clearer what shape the future relationship between the UK and the remaining member states will take. What […]


GDPR - what happens after Brexit

Michelle Waknine |

Will the GDPR still apply in the UK post-Brexit? The short answer is yes – once the UK exits the EU at 23:00 on 31 January 2020, all EU laws, including the GDPR, will automatically become part of UK domestic law due to the provisions of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018. As many GDPR […]


Trade Marks and Brexit

Ben Milloy |

What happens to EU trade marks after Brexit? A mere three and a half years after the 2016 referendum on membership of the European Union, the UK looks set to “leave” the EU on 31 January 2020. Instead of exiting without a deal (which at one stage looked distinctly possible), the UK’s departure will be […]


Heading for a Hard Brexit? Thoughts for the Facilities Management Outsourcing sector

Tim Wright |

It is the last week of June 2019. The UK referendum took place three years ago in June 2016. In March the following year, Prime Minister May wrote to Donald Tusk triggering the Article 50 process and the UK looked set to leave the EU on 29 March 2019. The date was enshrined in law […]


Frustrated by Brexit?

Roy Perrott |

Whatever your views on Brexit and whether the UK should leave or remain and on what terms, Brexit seems a source of frustration for many people.  The question that the court had to decide was: can a tenant end its lease early because of Brexit?  The outcome will reassure landlords but be a disappointment for […]


Possible implications of a ‘No Deal’ Brexit for commercial contracts

Leigh Callaway |

Despite a wealth of proposals, no clear majority has surfaced for any single legislative option in the House of Commons to manage the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union (Brexit). As such, as an operation of law on 29 March 2019, without an agreed or managed exit (a No Deal), contracts, domestic and international, will need to be reviewed for their effectiveness. Here we explore the potential effects of a No Deal on typical contractual terms.


Brexit – “No deal”, no bread, no drugs, no treat-ies

Anna Wakeling, Teresa Cullen |

Much of the law regulating family arrangements, Children Orders, Financial Orders, and indeed Divorces themselves are contained within EU law. If that ceases to apply it is important to consider, that urgent steps may need to be taken, or at least considered prior to the exit day.


Will Brexit affect the validity of a contractual English law clause?

Alexander Wildschütz |

The national law, which governs a commercial contract and will be applied in the event that parties end up in a dispute over their obligations, is currently determined under the rules of the Regulation (EC) No 593/2008. Known as the Rome I Regulation, its rules stipulate that the courts of all EU member states will […]


Brexit and Data Protection

Eddie Powell |

General position In amongst all the uncertainties of Brexit, the good (or bad, depending on your outlook) news is that GDPR will definitely still apply in UK, as part of our domestic law, for the foreseeable future, whatever happens. So Brexit should make very little difference to the way that your business handles data protection […]


Brexit and Competition law: Plus ça change plus c’est la même chose

Alex Haffner |

While debate continues in Parliament as to deal with the current blockage around the UK’s Withdrawal Agreement, back in the “real” world, businesses need to plan for the various outcomes currently being left in the hands of the politicians.


Brexit - the Government's legal advice

Charles Proctor |

In Tuesday’s post (‘Brexit – A Legal Quagmire’), we noted that the Government had been held to be in contempt of Parliament in consequence of its refusal to publish the Brexit legal advice furnished by the Attorney General.  As a result, the Department for Exiting the European Union published that advice at midday on Wednesday […]